Fifa should do post-mortem on use of video technology

World Cup referees awarded 11 penalties based on VAR playbacks, pushing the total number of penalties to a record high of 29.
World Cup referees awarded 11 penalties based on VAR playbacks, pushing the total number of penalties to a record high of 29. PHOTO: REUTERS

The Video Assistant Referee (VAR) made its debut in the recent World Cup in Russia.

The new technology had a big impact on several games and results.

Referees awarded 11 penalties based on VAR playbacks, pushing the total number of penalties to a record high of 29.

World Cup organisers should do a thorough review of the VAR technology and its application, in particular with regard to awarding penalties.

The organisers are duty-bound to investigate VAR-aided decisions , especially the controversial ones.

They should also ensure that their referees undergo some basic training in analysing VAR images, especially in reviewing slow-motion playback and reverse playback.

Slow-motion playback can distort our sense of the time factor involved in an incident.

The organisers should also review why VAR playbacks were shown live to millions of television audience worldwide. These videos should be for the eyes of the referees only.

They should also ensure that the decision-making independence of referees is not compromised because of VAR, as the technology should only be a tool.

Albert Ng Ya Ken