Time for Scoot to step up

Scoot has had about 10 major disruptions which have led to delays of up to 56 hours for affected passengers from Nov 26, 2018.
Scoot has had about 10 major disruptions which have led to delays of up to 56 hours for affected passengers from Nov 26, 2018.PHOTO: ST FILE

It is completely unacceptable that since Nov 26, Scoot has had about 10 major disruptions which have led to delays of up to 56 hours for affected passengers (Scoot flight turns back to Changi soon after take-off; Jan 9).

Mr Gerard de Vaz said that for an airline a technical delay does not constitute a "crisis" (Not fair to compare Scoot and SIA; Jan 9). He also said that Scoot is a low-cost carrier and offers "no-frills" service.

However, I wonder if a series of technical delays is bad enough to be considered a crisis for an airline.

People taking budget airlines are aware that they will not enjoy the same service standards as non-budget airlines.

However, it does not mean that they should expect to receive sub-standard treatment when their plane is grounded and they are left stranded at the airport. They are entitled to be worried and anxious.

In 2017, Scoot chief executive Lee Lik Hsin said: "The industry model has changed. It's no longer the bad old budget airlines of the past, leaving you stranded. We all take care of our customers."

If that assertion is to be taken as a commitment to provide better services as a budget airline, Mr Lee should now take full responsibility to address this series of disruptions which have negatively impacted Scoot's reputation.

Whatever one may wish to call this series of disruptions, it is time for the senior management of Scoot to deal with it decisively.

Charles Ho

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 15, 2019, with the headline 'Time for Scoot to step up'. Print Edition | Subscribe