Saving two birds with one stone

The Javan mynah, while considered an invasive species here, is actually a protected species in its native country of Indonesia as a result of poaching.
The Javan mynah, while considered an invasive species here, is actually a protected species in its native country of Indonesia as a result of poaching.PHOTO: LIM KIM SENG

Mr Ramamurthy Mahesh Kumar's letter brings a fresh perspective to the table (Is euthanising birds the only solution?; Jan 2).

I do recall reading about the Javan mynah population edging out our local common mynah a couple of years ago (The Javan mynah: Today's pest, tomorrow's food?; April 22, 2016).

Yet, for some reason, when my parents and I found a fallen and abandoned Javan mynah chick, we could not bring ourselves to just leave it there, alone and defenceless against its surrounding elements. We took it in last May and looked after it until it chose to leave some time around mid-December.

Like overprotective parents, we did not think it was quite ready to tackle living outdoors yet. So, like frantic parents, we put up posters of our missing mynah, and shared a post on Facebook.

However, one of the responses to my Facebook post brought to my attention to the fact that the Javan mynah, while considered an invasive species here, is actually a protected species in its native country of Indonesia as a result of poaching (Pitch to use S'pore's Javan mynahs for 'rescue' act; Feb 3, 2017).

This article made me wonder if "harvesting" members of the same species that have been introduced outside their native habitats, like researchers have suggested, could be a possible solution to the problems of two or more countries.

Marie Tan Kay Li Zoe (Miss)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 07, 2019, with the headline 'Saving two birds with one stone'. Print Edition | Subscribe