Refine traffic rules on power-assisted bicycles

The report "Jail, ban for driver who hit bicycle and injured trio" (July 28) calls into question a number of issues.

First, pillion riders on power-assisted bicycles must be above 16 years old.

In this case, two young children were riding pillion. Was the bicycle rider fined for putting the children in danger?

Second, a car driver is expected to slow down and be ready to stop before reaching a zebra crossing.

The driver has to come to a complete stop only if someone is crossing or starting to cross. This does not apply if someone is only approaching the crossing.

So, what happens if a power-assisted bicycle turns into the crossing, possibly suddenly from out of the dark and at a high speed?

The interval between approaching the crossing and starting to cross it is a matter of seconds.

Something is wrong with a law that puts all pedestrian-crossing users who move at such different speeds - a person on foot moves at 4 to 6 kmh, while a power-assisted bicycle can reach up to 25kmh - into the same category.

Something is wrong with a law that puts all pedestrian-crossing users who move at such different speeds - a person on foot moves at 4 to 6 kmh, while a power-assisted bicycle can reach up to 25kmh - into the same category.

Are drivers expected to stop completely at zebra crossings just in case a power-assisted bicycle turns up?

Third, was the zebra crossing joined to a pedestrian pathway that permits shared use by power-assisted bicycles?

It would certainly be interesting to know how the unfortunate accident could have been prevented, with traffic laws properly written and enforced for all road and pedestrian path users.

Amy Loh Chee Seen (Ms)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 02, 2018, with the headline 'Refine traffic rules on power-assisted bicycles'. Print Edition | Subscribe