Recourse for victims harassed by neighbours

A 51-year-old housewife who has been accused of harassing her neighbours. She moved into the flat in 2013 with her son, and interviews with neighbours indicate that the trouble began the year after.
A 51-year-old housewife who has been accused of harassing her neighbours. She moved into the flat in 2013 with her son, and interviews with neighbours indicate that the trouble began the year after.ST PHOTO: KHALID BABA

It must have been a harrowing experience for the six families who had to endure the harassment from a contentious neighbour and were finally forced to move out ('Neighbour from hell' drove 6 families away, June 23).

Splashing paint at someone's door, playing loud music, stomping on the floor, and reportedly leaving a bloody pig's ear on a shoe rack - these were undoubtedly acts to harass victims.

Police reports were filed, complaints about the annoyances were lodged with the Housing Board and the constituency's residents' committee, but these were to no avail.

There is recourse and civil remedies for victims of harassment, under the Protection from Harassment Act 1997.

Victims may apply for a Protection Order, and in urgent cases, the court may grant a temporary Expedited Protection Order. Breaches of Protection Orders or Expedited Protection Orders can be dealt with by the police and court.

George Pasqual

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 01, 2019, with the headline 'Recourse for victims harassed by neighbours'. Print Edition | Subscribe