People will benefit only if laws are rigorously enforced

I feel that too often good plans by policymakers do not percolate to the ground as they get waylaid in the eventual execution.

Take, for example, the Active Mobility Act which kicked in on May 1and which aims to curb the reckless riding of e-mobility devices, among others.

At Pasir Ris Beach Park where I regularly run and take walks in the evenings, I often see groups of teenagers riding their e-scooters very fast.

It is no longer possible to take a relaxed stroll as one has to constantly look out for these devices.

It is also not safe for young children to ride their bikes in this park. Being children, they do not always keep to one side of the path and do not know how to react to a speeding e-mobility device rushing towards them.

These are just accidents waiting to happen.

My question is, where is the follow-up enforcement to the well-intentioned laws?

I feel that too often good plans by policymakers do not percolate to the ground as they get waylaid in the eventual execution.

I do not see why e-mobility devices should even have a place in parks. They are more suited for last-mile commutes from MRT stations and bus stops, and should be barred from parks.

Furthermore, the teenagers mentioned make pit stops frequently to smoke. They look much younger than 18 years. Where, again, is the enforcement?

I laud our leaders for coming up with a whole-of-government approach to solving issues.

But, I think it is equally important they look at the approach as a whole too, to ensure good intentions go down to benefit the people through rigorous follow-up enforcement.

Peh Chwee Hoe

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 25, 2018, with the headline 'People will benefit only if laws are rigorously enforced'. Print Edition | Subscribe