Noise a problem at parks, gyms

The problem of noise pollution is now also in parks, where riders of personal mobility devices and bicycles turn up their radios or sound machines.
The problem of noise pollution is now also in parks, where riders of personal mobility devices and bicycles turn up their radios or sound machines.PHOTO: ST FILE

A recent report raised the problem of noise pollution causing hearing problems, loss of hearing at certain frequencies and tinnitus, even among the young.

Those affected were exposed to loud noises in discos, concerts, construction sites and factories.

The authorities, recognising the problem, have instituted measures to cut down noise made by MRT trains and at construction sites.

The National Environment Agency (NEA) highlighted that contractors can be fined for excessive noise even when there are no complaints (NEA acts on contractors violating noise regulations, and not only when there are complaints, March 28).

The problem of noise pollution is now also in parks, where riders of personal mobility devices and bicycles turn up their radios or sound machines.

Parks are meant for recreation and rest, and this peaceful environment should not be spoilt by excessively loud music.

Noise pollution has also "invaded'' gyms where those who need to concentrate on their exercises are subjected to loud music coming from the rooms used for dance classes. It is understandable that music is needed for the dance classes and to increase energy levels, but surely there should be consideration for other gym users.

NEA should consider monitoring the noise level in gyms that could aggravate hearing loss. Gyms could also soundproof the rooms used for the dance classes so that other gym users can have some peace and quiet to exercise.

Quek Koh Choon (Dr)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 29, 2019, with the headline 'Noise a problem at parks, gyms'. Print Edition | Subscribe