No practical solution to noise pollution, so we should adapt

The problem of noise pollution is now also in parks, where riders of personal mobility devices and bicycles turn up their radios or sound machines.
The problem of noise pollution is now also in parks, where riders of personal mobility devices and bicycles turn up their radios or sound machines.PHOTO: ST FILE

There is little we can do to avoid noise if we want to coexist with one another (Noise a problem at parks, gyms, by Dr Quek Koh Choon, March 29).

Should the sale of motorcycles and sport cars be restricted because of noise? Should the Land Transport Authority ban commuters from talking loudly on their phones and to one another, or playing loud music on public transport? Should announcements be banned at MRT and bus stations because they are disruptive to commuters?

The list is endless if we were to be sensitive to noise.

Private and public gyms do not cater to just one person. If a person finds the music loud or that gym users are talking loudly, he should just move away or wear earplugs.

There is no solution to noise pollution other than stopping the activity that is causing it, but how is it possible to stop it without encroaching on people's personal rights?

People need to adjust and adapt because even though noise pollution can be annoying, its effects are minimal compared with other types of pollution which can be more harmful.

Cheng Choon Fei

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 02, 2019, with the headline 'No practical solution to noise pollution, so we should adapt'. Print Edition | Subscribe