Forum: No double-standards mentality: Have same penalty for same offence

The rule of law should be fairly enforced on offenders, regardless of their socio-economic backgrounds (Peg fines to offender's salary, by Miss Samantha Lim Li Min, Dec 3).

I disagree with Miss Lim's suggestion that when meting out sentences, including fines, an offender's financial background should be considered.

In the case of the lawyer who was fined $15,000 for molesting three women, I expect any other offender, even if he were an average wage earner, to face the same punishment for the same offence.

A motorist's driving licence is suspended if he has accumulated excessive demerit points within a certain period. However, it would be unfair and inequitable if this penalty were not applied to people such as cabbies and delivery workers.

We can empathise with these people whose livelihood depends on driving, but there will be dire consequences if they are treated differently and leniently for dangerous traffic offences.

In other words, we should do away with the double-standards mentality which can cause much controversy and unhappiness, particularly when a rule or policy favours one group or person over another.

We have read how double standards and the absence of the rule of law in some countries have resulted in social and political unrest, which in turn hinders their development and progress.

We have read how double standards and the absence of the rule of law in some countries have resulted in social and political unrest, which in turn hinders their development and progress.

Singaporeans should continue to attach greater importance to being fair and impartial in whatever circumstances they are in.

Jeffrey Law Lee Beng

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 05, 2019, with the headline 'No double-standards mentality: Have same penalty for same offence'. Print Edition | Subscribe