More discretion needed during random checks

A commuter at Little India MRT station being directed to go through a security screening on Nov 12, 2018.
A commuter at Little India MRT station being directed to go through a security screening on Nov 12, 2018.PHOTO: ST FILE

The Public Transport Security Command officers who stopped Forum contributor Carl Tay for a random check should have shown some respect for his right to privacy, and probably checked his belongings in a more secluded area or corner of the MRT station (Explain protocol for random checks, May 24).

I cannot imagine how much more embarrassing and intrusive it would have been if the commuter who was checked was a woman.

Personal feminine or hygiene products, if accidentally dropped during such random checks, would embarrass all parties.

I have friends whose wallets are not regularly cleared of items such as supermarket or other receipts and discount vouchers, making their wallets bulky and quite messy. They definitely would not want such habits exposed in public.

Although I have not had random checks carried out on my belongings, I certainly hope that if my turn should come, more discretion could be exercised by the officers concerned.

Transport security personnel should respect commuters' privacy when conducting random checks.

Of course, they need to also exercise their professional judgment at all times.

In an emergency or where a person obviously has dangerous weapons in his possession, then they may have to act fast in the interest of everyone's safety.

Low Siew Hua

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 27, 2019, with the headline 'More discretion needed during random checks'. Print Edition | Subscribe