Martial arts teach more than fighting

Angela Lee holding down her opponent in their ONE Championship women’s atomweight title match at the Singapore Indoor Stadium, on May 6, 2016.
Angela Lee holding down her opponent in their ONE Championship women’s atomweight title match at the Singapore Indoor Stadium, on May 6, 2016.PHOTO: THE NEW PAPER

Martial arts can build strength in character among the youth. This courage and determination spurs individuals to try harder even after many failures, which is vital in Singapore's competitive culture.

Of course, learning martial arts is not the only way to develop one's character, but it can be a very effective way, due to the training and practice regimen.

Such determination and perseverance to overcome a formidable foe is what the youth need to cultivate to thrive in Singapore's cutting-edge society.

Picking up martial arts is an engaging way to build up the courage to stand up for what is right. As a martial arts student, I understood the weight of a punch when I tried sparring with my classmates. It helped me understand that even as individuals, we can have an impact on others in ways we never imagined.

Goh Yan Yi, 15

Secondary 3 student

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 19, 2019, with the headline 'Martial arts teach more than fighting'. Print Edition | Subscribe