Many measures in place to reduce wildlife road incidents

A rope linking two patches of forest across a water body at Mandai Road, part of a trial by NParks which is looking into ways of improving connectivity for animals to travel safely through fragmented landscapes.
A rope linking two patches of forest across a water body at Mandai Road, part of a trial by NParks which is looking into ways of improving connectivity for animals to travel safely through fragmented landscapes. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

Roadkill incidents are known to occur near forested areas around Singapore and, regrettably, they are a fact of life in urban environments that border nature all around our country (Three rare native mammals found as roadkill in Mandai, near works to build new zoos; March 23).

For some years, Mandai Park Holdings has been working with partners like Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres) to rescue and rehabilitate wildlife involved in such incidents, including those that occur in the Mandai area.

Our current parks are in close proximity to wildlife in Mandai and reducing wildlife road incidents there is a priority for us.

We are building an eco-link bridge to provide safe passage for wildlife in our precinct.

There will be more fencing to guide wildlife to this eco-link bridge when it is completed next year.

Since 2016, we have deployed speed reduction measures in Mandai Lake Road, cutting down the speed limit to 20kmh to 40kmh.

These include multiple speed humps, regulating strips and wildlife crossing signs lining the road reminding drivers to slow down and look out for wildlife.

To make crossing safer for tree-dwelling animals, the implementation of aerial crossing aids is also underway.

We are closely monitoring wildlife road incidents within and around the project area, through a dedicated team that responds round the clock to them.

There has not been an observable increase in roadkill incidents since work began on the Mandai Project.

While the majority of incidents involve common wildlife species such as the plantain squirrel, Javan myna and Asian toad, unfortunately, there were two incidents involving animals of conservation significance in Mandai Lake Road.

All incidents of roadkill are of concern to us, and we continually review the effectiveness of our speed reduction and wildlife protection measures.

We are regularly consulting our stakeholders and experts to learn from our monitoring data, and to identify and deploy new and innovative solutions to help reduce roadkill incidents, wherever possible.

Drivers can play their part, too, by looking out for wildlife and understanding that the reduced speed limit along the stretch is to help protect animals.

The public can report wildlife incidents along the road by calling our 24/7 wildlife response hotline on 9088-5068.

Philip Yim

Senior Vice-President

Mandai Park Development

(subsidiary of Mandai Park Holdings)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 29, 2018, with the headline 'Many measures in place to reduce wildlife road incidents'. Print Edition | Subscribe