Harmony - political leaders and people play a part

Office workers of different races walking across Raffles Quay, on March 7, 2019.
Office workers of different races walking across Raffles Quay, on March 7, 2019.PHOTO: ST FILE

It is through the concerted effort of everyone that Singaporeans have enjoyed racial and religious harmony (Survey results point to success of Govt's racial integration policy, April 2).

The values of mutual respect and sensitivity among the various ethnic groups fostered over the years have transformed Singapore into such a harmonious nation.

Thanks to strong neighbourly ties, residents of all races accommodate one another's customs and practices, such as the burning of joss paper or the holding of wedding celebrations in community spaces.

It is good that our political leaders have steered away from highly sensitive issues, such as race and religion during Parliament sittings, election rallies or outreach programmes.

In some countries, leaders make use of race and religion, especially during election campaigns, to gain voters' support.

This self-serving attitude often results in social incoherence, public distrust as well as lawlessness and disorder.

We must not take our racial and religious harmony for granted.

Instead, all of us should continue to safeguard and strengthen the fabric of our society.

Jeffrey Law Lee Beng

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 04, 2019, with the headline 'Harmony - political leaders and people play a part'. Print Edition | Subscribe