Giving red packets: Each case assessed on its merits

One of the signs put up at Mandai Crematorium to remind the public not to offer money or gifts to the employees. Workers at the government-run Mandai Crematorium are not allowed to receive cash or gifts, but some industry insiders said the illegal pr
One of the signs put up at Mandai Crematorium to remind the public not to offer money or gifts to the employees. LIANHE ZAOBAO FILE PHOTOS

We thank Dr Ho Ting Fei for her letter (Red packets often given as a show of thanks, Feb 7).

The Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) is unable to comment on the case that the writer referred to in her letter as investigations are ongoing.

However, we wish to highlight that each case is assessed on its merits to determine if it is a case of corruption. A gift given innocently and without any corrupt intention is not considered corruption. However, if a gift is given or received with a view to secure or to reciprocate with, for example, an unfair advantage, it may constitute corruption.

We assure the public that the CPIB evaluates all complaints and information it receives seriously - regardless of the value of gratification involved - in order to determine whether corruption offences are made out under the Prevention of Corruption Act.

Ms Clare Tan

Senior Assistant Director (Corporate Relations)

Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 11, 2019, with the headline 'Giving red packets: Each case assessed on its merits'. Print Edition | Subscribe