Excerpts from readers' letters

LONGER RIDE WILL HELP SMRT CEO

It is refreshing that the new SMRT chief executive Neo Kian Hong has forgone his car for the train (SMRT adding 12 trains to two most heavily used lines; Aug 14).

This is walking the talk, and I am sure commuters are hoping that he will be closer to the ground and will make some effective changes.

However, since he livesnear Shunfu, it will just take him one or two MRT stations to reach his office in Bishan.

I am afraid this is too short a distance for him to understand the average commuter's plight.

I would suggest that he commute from Jurong East, Yishun or Tampines during the rush hours to understand the problems and have a feel of how crowded our trains are.

Perhaps the senior management of SMRT could follow in the footsteps of Mr Neo and take the train daily. This will not only adhere to the Government's pledge of a car-lite society, but also be useful for the SMRT team to have first-hand knowledge of commuters' woes.

Lim Choon Guan


WAY TO CUT CHEQUE USE

One way to encourage businesses to use fewer cheques is to give each business bank account a certain number of free transactions per month via the Fast And Secure Transfers (Fast) service.

Compared with cheque payment, Fast payment is not hostage to unreliable postal service, is not subject to potential fraud by way of cheque forgery and is less time-consuming.

Currently, most business bank accounts enjoy a certain number of free cheque transactions per month. Businesses are reluctant to switch over to Fast payment because it attracts a fee from the first transaction.

If business bank accounts can be offered, say, 30 free Fast transactions per month, many businesses can be persuaded to give up cheque payment in favour of Fast payment.

Cheng Shoong Tat


NDP DID SINGAPORE PROUD

I am always proud of Singapore, but I was exceptionally proud on National Day because Singapore showed the world what it is made of.

From the national servicemen guarding the entrance to the National Day Parade venue to the singers on stage, all played a different role but served a common purpose, which was to celebrate Singapore's birthday.

I salute all the participants as they had worked many weekends to prepare for the parade and give their best for Singapore.

Since our nation gained independence 53 years ago, we have all worked as one despite our different roles. We may be small in size but we are a giant in our influence - take, for example, the Trump-Kim summit this year.

May our country stay prosperous and safe for many years to come.

Maa Zhi Hong


YOUNG BOYS SET GREAT EXAMPLE

I had a delightful experience on National Day.

Some friends and I were across from the floating platform to enjoy a picnic and watch the fireworks.

After most people had left the picnic grounds, we were a little dismayed to note there was still litter on the ground despite there being a prominent rubbish bin.

Before we could act, along came a boy of about nine or 10, holding a large plastic bag. He and another boy picked up the rubbish and even asked us and others if we had any rubbish to throw.

We saw two women to whom the boys returned. Kudos to these women who have inculcated in the boys good values. They set an example for the rest of us to follow.

If all of us would berole models and teach our children from a young age to love our environment and keep it clean, we will still have a Singapore that we can enjoy and be proud of in the years to come.

Lee Ee Koon (Mrs)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 17, 2018, with the headline 'Excerpts from readers' letters'. Print Edition | Subscribe