Excerpts from readers' letters

INSTALL SPEED HUMPS ON WALKWAYS

I suggest that humps be installed on walkways to slow speeding bicycles and e-bikes.

Yellow and black vulcanised rubber humps of 1.2m to 1.5m width can be fixed easily onto walkways and it would not be too costly to install.

It will save lives.

Peh Choo Huat


HAVE WATER COOLERS AT FOODCOURTS

Food and beverage businesses have a key role to play in the war on diabetes.

Most patrons at hawker centres and foodcourts often buy sweet drinks to go with their meal.

The Health Promotion Board should work with the National Environment Agency as well as foodcourt operators to install water coolers in food centres.

With drinking water freely available, fewer patrons would feel the urge to purchase sweet drinks.

Kevin Tong Weng Jin


MAKE A LITTLE EFFORT TO BE GRACIOUS

Despite numerous campaigns and initiatives, a significant number of people still do not return their trays at food centres.

Tray return contributes to a faster turnover of tables.

It would also reduce pests and birds as there would not be any unattended leftovers on the table.

If people make a little effort to return their tray after their meal, Singapore can gradually turn into a cleaner and more gracious society.

Vivian Tan Wei En (Ms)


FOCUS ON PLASTIC WASTE TOO

I was disappointed that Environment and Water Resources Minister Masagos Zulkifli said the more pressing issue facing Singapore is electronic waste rather than plastics (E-waste a more pressing issue than plastics: Masagos; Aug 3).

He said: "When you try to do everything, you will end up doing nothing, so do the most important things first - and right now, we are tackling e-waste."

But, can't we do things simultaneously?

Damage to the environment from plastic waste is so obvious.

Mr Masagos believes that the issue is about reducing the demand for plastics.Will people cut their demand when plastic bags are given free?

Much has been said about the success of levies and fines in cutting plastic waste in other cities. It is rather difficult to believe that such a scheme would not work in Singapore.

Eddie Lee Wai Seng


E-HEALTH RECORDS WILL NOT HELP ALL

I refer to the compulsory extension of the National Electronic Health Record (NEHR) system to private medical and dental clinics.

BANKING ON DBS TO SHINE

DBS' transformation over the past five decades has been nothing short of phenomenal (DBS played key role taking risks in its early years for S'pore; Aug 5).

From its humble beginnings, DBS is today one of the world's top banks.

With today's global business conditions in constant flux and technological disruption becoming ever more dominant, every banking decision now is contingent upon a carefully calibrated confluence of multi-factorial considerations while satisfying ever more stringent governance and risk-management parameters.

With the banking landscape thus set for more challenges in the years to come, there should be little doubt that DBS will continue to be at the forefront of it all.

Woon Wee Min

I support the use of NEHR in large institutions and the public healthcare sector. It allows for the easy transfer of records and information, monitoring disease trends as well as studies on the efficacy of treatments.

It is cost-effective for large institutions.

However, making it compulsory for small, private medical and dental clinics is onerous for them. The increased costs will also lead to an increase in patient fees.

There is the issue of ensuring cyber security as well.

To monitor healthcare trends, data from public hospitals, school health services and SAF Medical Corps is sufficient, without the need to collect more information from others.

Lewis Lee Kim Chuan (Dr)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 10, 2018, with the headline 'Excerpts from readers' letters'. Print Edition | Subscribe