Excerpts from readers' letters

WATER DISPENSERS AT FOOD CENTRES

A way to fight diabetes is to have water dispensers installed in all our hawker centres.

Singaporeans can drink free water from the dispensers, using stainless steel cups provided to customers for 10 cents which is refunded when one's tray is returned. This will reduce the buying and drinking of sugary drinks.

Koong Kok On

HOW TO CHECK CHARITY PERMITS?

I was approached by donation drive volunteers recently, who were quick to show their National Council of Social Service (NCSS) permits on request.

But I am none the wiser on the permits' authenticity. It takes far too long to check the registration number online or on the phone. The charity's stamp and signature are there, but they can be easily counterfeited.

The NCSS should consider strengthening the security features of its permit, so that members of the public are more confident to contribute.

Josh Tang Weijie

CLOSE SHOPS FOR TWO DAYS OVER CNY

There used to be a time when practically all supermarkets and shopping malls would be shut for the first two days of Chinese New Year.

A few years back, many of these outlets started to operate on the second day of Chinese New Year; staff are then given a day off in lieu.

But now, some supermarkets are open on the first day of Chinese New Year, albeit till 5pm.

It would be good to bring back the two full days of public holiday. This would allow families to have time to bond, and to visit relatives and friends without any absentees because of work.

It would also be a way to show appreciation to staff in shopping malls and supermarkets who have worked hard in the weeks and days leading up to Chinese New Year, which is one of the busiest times for retail and supermarket shopping.

Florence Veronica Minjoot

ANIMAL ACTIVISTS V PUBLIC INTEREST

I agree that we must moderate the enthusiasm of animal rights activists (Curb radical animal rights activists, by Mr Ong Junkai; Jan 16).

I hope they can work objectively with the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority to take into account the bigger public interest and not pursue animal rights at all costs.

I also suggest that they stop blaming the public for unsavoury wildlife encounters. This is no way to get public support.

Lim Ang Yong

CONSIDER JAIL FOR CORPORATE CRIMES

It is worrying that companies can get away with offences such as bribery by paying a sum of money as a fine, even if it is a heavy fine (New legal framework proposed for corporate offences; Jan 16).

It would be more logical to include mandatory imprisonment as deterrence.

Corporate offences are committed by individuals and they should be held accountable to show the gravity of the offence.

Seah Yam Meng

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 19, 2018, with the headline 'Excerpts from readers' letters'. Print Edition | Subscribe