Forum: Excerpts from readers' letters

A rider on an electric scooter riding on a shared path near Bugis.
A rider on an electric scooter riding on a shared path near Bugis.ST PHOTO: KELLY HUI

PMDS AS LAST-MILE TRANSPORT

Senior Minister of State for Transport Janil Puthucheary said in Parliament on Monday that personal mobility devices (PMDs) are useful devices for first-and last-mile connectivity.

But I do not see many PMDs being used for this purpose. The authorities should study whether PMDs have actually achieved this aim. This would help to determine if a ban is necessary.

Ng Kei Yong


LOWER ZOO ENTRY FEE FOR YOUNG KIDS

The Singapore Zoo is one of the best zoos in South-east Asia. But a $25 entry fee for a three-year-old child is too expensive. On a recent visit, I paid $100 for my four grandchildren aged three to nine years old.

The Singapore Zoo should consider giving free admission to children between the ages of three and six years old.

Angie Koh


NO EXCUSE FOR BAD BEHAVIOUR

I agree with Professor Tommy Koh's observation that Singapore is a First World country with Third World people.

I have seen adults accompanying pupils home from school jumping queues at the bus interchange. Using tissue paper and name cards to "chope" seats at hawker centres and food courts is a practice so notorious that a visitor from the West told me she had heard about it and wanted to experience it. Then there are public transport commuters who play music loudly on their mobile phones.

It is time for Singaporeans to stop making excuses for such bad behaviour.

Ng Soh Hong


BAN PHONES IN PUBLIC LIBRARIES

On a recent visit to the Clementi Public Library, I noticed that about two-thirds of the visitors were using their mobile phones, retirees were there just to enjoy the air-conditioning, and many students were playing games on their phones and laptops.

It seems that many people go to the library for the wrong reasons. For a start, we should ban the use of mobile phones in libraries.

John Mitchell


WHAT TO DO WITH LEFTOVER MEDICINE

My father, whose condition was terminal, died less than two weeks after he was discharged from the hospital.

But he was prescribed enough medication and sold milk supplies to last months. What are we to do with all of them now?

More importantly, he was also given morphine, and I have been told that it cannot be returned.

My father should not have been given so much medication if he was not expected to live long.

Chua Boon Hou

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 11, 2019, with the headline 'Excerpts from readers' letters'. Print Edition | Subscribe