Ensure enough resources to meet home healthcare needs

I certainly agree that our professional expectations, and consequent standards of accountability, of domestic helpers are manifestly incommensurate with their level of training and expertise (Maid pleads guilty to ill-treating bedridden boy; March 7).

It may be reasonable to expect strict compliance with instructions for narrowly defined tasks relating to routine household chores, where training for contingencies and emergencies is not needed.

However, is it fair to expect a foreign domestic worker to handle complex medical devices when caring for a physically incapacitated, chronically-ill person?

Perhaps we should take this opportunity to take a more expansive approach to avoid similar mishaps in the future.

Do we have enough resources to aid families with the long-term care of chronically-ill patients with complex and costly health needs?

Is it fair to expect a foreign domestic worker to handle complex medical devices when caring for a physically incapacitated, chronically-ill person? Perhaps we should take this opportunity to take a more expansive approach to avoid similar mishaps in the future.

Are adequate measures in place to ensure proper training and supervision for persons caring for sick people in the home?

Are foreign domestic workers informed of the social norms and legal boundaries of their actions while at work in Singapore homes?

How do we ensure that these workers get adequate legal representation and appropriate psychological support when undergoing legal proceedings?

These are pressing matters for our society.

Mohamad Farid Harunal Rashid

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 25, 2017, with the headline 'Ensure enough resources to meet home healthcare needs'. Print Edition | Subscribe