Enforce rule of burning joss paper in bins

Birds flocking to food offerings left behind by residents. Not cleaning up after carrying out religious activities leaves the environment in a sad and unhygienic state.
Birds flocking to food offerings left behind by residents. Not cleaning up after carrying out religious activities leaves the environment in a sad and unhygienic state.PHOTO COURTESY OF KOSAKA YURI

Around this time every year, there is the traditional burning of joss sticks and paper, something which I have noticed in my last 20 years of living in Singapore.

It is good that the different religions are allowed to practise their faith.

However, my concerns lie not in the fact that these activities take place but, rather, that they occur right below our windows on the grass patches that are clearly not designated for burning such items.

Sometimes, the burning of such items takes place on the pavements.

Out of respect, many people try to avoid trampling on these offerings, but when the burning takes place on the pavements, avoiding them becomes difficult, unless you avoid the pavement altogether.

Also, the offerings are left there to be cleared by the cleaners.

People should use the burning bins provided and not do it anywhere they like.

In my estate, the food offerings that are left all over attract flocks of pigeons, which is completely unhygienic.

I am aware that not all those who participate in this religious activity leave their environment in such a sad state, and that the majority are very conscientious about cleaning up and carrying out their activities as the rules state.

It is sad to see a handful spoil this image.

Kosaka Yuri (Ms)

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 21, 2017, with the headline 'Enforce rule of burning joss paper in bins'. Print Edition | Subscribe