Employee commitment dependent on situation

Office workers cross the road in Singapore's financial district on Feb 14, 2018.
Office workers cross the road in Singapore's financial district on Feb 14, 2018. PHOTO: ST FILE

Mr Jeffrey Law Lee Beng in his letter came to the defence of part-time employees (Wrong to assume part-timers are less committed, June 20). In my opinion, much depends on individual workers having the right attitude and the amount of appreciation shown by the employer.

Total commitment cannot be expected, for example, in a situation in which no replacement is found after a full-time employee resigns, with existing staff covering extra duties while earning their original salary.

Similarly, a full-time worker may be required to work part-time as part of the organisation's efforts to be cost-effective. This would have a serious psychological impact on the worker and affect his efficiency, since he now has to work harder to achieve the same standard as a full-timer, while suffering a pay cut and compromised benefits.

However, a part-timer given the right training and motivation will take pride in his work.

So the issue of whether part-timers are less committed than full-time employees is dependent on the individual's morale and working situation.

Tan Keong Boon

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 24, 2019, with the headline 'Employee commitment dependent on situation'. Print Edition | Subscribe