Forum: Don't penalise all PMD riders because of acts of a few

A man rides his PMD on a cycling path.
A man rides his PMD on a cycling path. ST PHOTO: JASON QUAH

I second Dr Yik Keng Yeong's idea of letting personal mobility devices (PMDs) go on roads (Let e-scooters go on roads, Nov 6).

Better yet, why not follow China or other countries that actually provide a smaller 2m to 3m slow lane on the left for those users?

First, it will immediately remove the possibility of hitting pedestrians walking slowly on the pavement. Second, other vehicles will not have to keep a look out for or give way to PMD riders, get frustrated over speed differences, or get into unwanted accidents.

An accident here and there doesn't mean that all riders are reckless speed demons, only a small number in comparison with the whole. Injuries and deaths as a result of using PMDs or driving are caused by negligence, carelessness or recklessness. And the drivers or PMD riders at fault will pay the penalty in fines or a jail term.

By doing this, the Government will have a higher chance of maintaining law and order, delivering convenience to users, and ultimately achieving a car-lite society. A total ban of anything won't solve any problem.

Melvin Chan Keng Loon

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 09, 2019, with the headline 'Don't penalise all PMD riders because of acts of a few'. Print Edition | Subscribe