Why investing in China in 2020 can be tricky but rewarding

Look beyond near-term volatility and focus on fundamentals, long-term growth prospects

A pumper-truck production line at a factory in Zhangjiakou in China’s northern Hebei province. The negative impact on China’s economy from past events like Sars, Mers, avian flu and swine flu were fairly brief, and the subsequent recoveries were sharp. No
A pumper-truck production line at a factory in Zhangjiakou in China’s northern Hebei province. The negative impact on China’s economy from past events like Sars, Mers, avian flu and swine flu were fairly brief, and the subsequent recoveries were sharp. None of them derailed the country’s broad economic growth. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Investing in China can be a tricky affair. "China is slowing" is a headline repeatedly plastered all over the mainstream media ever since it released its second-quarter gross domestic product growth rate, amid strained trade relations with the United States.

The headlines are not wrong - China's growth has indeed decelerated.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on February 09, 2020, with the headline 'Why investing in China in 2020 can be tricky but rewarding'. Subscribe