The ills of overworking at home

It is not only employees' health that suffers when regularly working long hours. It is also their work. Research has suggested relationships between rest and problem-solving ability, between time away from work and some aspects of job performance, an
It is not only employees' health that suffers when regularly working long hours. It is also their work. Research has suggested relationships between rest and problem-solving ability, between time away from work and some aspects of job performance, and between sleep deprivation and lower cognitive performance.ST PHOTO: GIN TAY

Overwork and burnout aren't just issues at investment banks. For many, the pandemic has essentially erased the boundaries between work and home: White-collar workers feel stretched to their breaking point. And when offices reopen in earnest, few expect overwork to vanish or burnout to be relegated to the past.

Research suggests all of this excess work isn't good for anyone, employers included.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on May 02, 2021, with the headline 'The ills of overworking at home'. Subscribe