Interest in Andaman tribe soars after deadly contact

Mr John Allen Chau broke Indian law that prevents access to North Sentinel Island and slipped past layers of security, including a 5km buffer zone around it. A photo taken on Dec 28, 2004, after the tsunami shows a Sentinelese aiming his bow and arro
Mr John Allen Chau broke Indian law that prevents access to North Sentinel Island and slipped past layers of security, including a 5km buffer zone around it.PHOTO: JOHNACHAU/ INSTAGRAM
Mr John Allen Chau broke Indian law that prevents access to North Sentinel Island and slipped past layers of security, including a 5km buffer zone around it. A photo taken on Dec 28, 2004, after the tsunami shows a Sentinelese aiming his bow and arro
A photo taken on Dec 28, 2004, after the tsunami shows a Sentinelese aiming his bow and arrow at a helicopter.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Retrieving body of American killed by tribe a challenge as they fiercely resist outside contact

A man, armed with a bow and arrow, valiantly chases his unseen photographer. This picture of the hostile Sentinelese man taken from a helicopter flying over India's Andaman and Nicobar Islands after the December 2004 tsunami is one of the iconic images that have shaped the outside world's perception of this little known, indeed even misunderstood, tribe.

The Sentinelese, who live on North Sentinel Island, were catapulted to global attention again this week after it emerged that they had killed an American missionary who had set foot on their island.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 26, 2018, with the headline 'Interest in Andaman tribe soars after deadly contact'. Print Edition | Subscribe