10 must-reads for today

Students protesting in Mumbai yesterday against the violent clashes at the Jawaharlal Nehru University on Sunday.
Students protesting in Mumbai yesterday against the violent clashes at the Jawaharlal Nehru University on Sunday.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
Luo Huining.
Luo Huining.PHOTO: BLOOMBERG

1 Outrage over uni attack

An attack by a mob armed with sticks and iron rods at a New Delhi university on Sunday has triggered outrage in a new challenge for Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who is already grappling with student-driven protests against a contentious citizenship law. More than 30 students and professors were injured in the three-hour attack.

2 Chan on foreign talent

The purpose of bringing in the right number of foreign workers, with the right types of skills, is purely to benefit Singaporeans, Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing asserted in Parliament yesterday, addressing the hot button issue of foreign talent.

3 No boundaries report yet

The Electoral Boundaries Review Committee, formed on Aug 1 in the first formal step towards the next general election, has not completed its work. The release of the report, which will detail the battleground for the election, comes before the President dissolves Parliament and issues the Writ of Election.

4 China's new top HK envoy

Observers believe that the appointment of experienced politician Luo Huining as director of the Chinese central government's liaison office in Hong Kong is intended to unite the divided pro-Beijing camp in the city. The immediate task is to iron out any differences ahead of the Legislative Council elections in September.

5 Biggest geopolitical risk

No matter who wins the United States presidential election, the outcome will be extremely divisive. The fallout will extend beyond the US, making the White House race the biggest geopolitical risk for the world this year, says geopolitical expert Ian Bremmer.

6 Staying despite court order

Members of the family living in a three-room Housing Board flat in Pending Road said that they do not intend to comply with the first-ever Exclusion Order. The Community Disputes Resolution Tribunal had directed that Madam Iwa and Mr Low Bok Siong be barred from their flat for one month after they were found guilty of breaching an earlier court order.

7 Undertakers apologise

Harmony Funeral Care and Century Products have apologised for the mix-up and cremation of a wrong body. The two undertakers said that they will "make appropriate amends" to the family of Mr Kee Kin Tiong, 82, whose body was mistakenly cremated on Monday last week.

8 Easier overseas remittance

British fintech firm TransferWise has incorporated PayNow into its international remittance service so that recipients no longer need to disclose bank account details. Businesses and individuals can now receive money from abroad by simply providing the sender with a mobile phone number.

9 New women's golf event here

Local women professional golfers will have a chance to compete on home ground at the Singapore Ladies Invitational in November. The inaugural event offers prize money of US$100,000 (S$135,000) and will have 10 slots for Singaporeans.

10 Big year for arts events

Senior culture correspondent Ong Sor Fern highlights the blockbuster arts events this year, including re-stagings of landmark theatre productions and tent-pole events such as the Singapore Writers Festival.


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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 07, 2020, with the headline '10 must-reads for today'. Print Edition | Subscribe