Widening US sanctions make it harder to invest in Myanmar, but will not change much

Few expect the sanctions declared on Dec 10 to change the status quo in Myanmar's political crisis. PHOTO: REUTERS
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BANGKOK - Top United States diplomat Antony Blinken visited Indonesia and Malaysia this week after Washington announced sanctions on another list of military-linked entities and individuals in Myanmar.

Few expect the sanctions declared on Dec 10 to change the status quo in Myanmar's political crisis. But the growing list of targeted entities - and the threat of more - is narrowing the space for international corporations to invest in Myanmar, say consultants. Such concerns will also hang over companies in Singapore, from which many multinational companies invest in Myanmar.

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