Thai PM Prayut, Bangkok chief hauled to court over air pollution crisis

The bad air in Bangkok has forced people young and old to resort to wearing face masks. The smog also forced the authorities to issue an unprecedented order to shut nearly 450 schools last month.
The bad air in Bangkok has forced people young and old to resort to wearing face masks. PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration is using drones to spray a water-based solution in the air to try and ease the effects of heavy smog.
The smog also forced the authorities to issue an unprecedented order to shut nearly 450 schools last month.PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

They are accused by environment body and some Bangkok residents of failing to act over dangerous smog

BANGKOK • Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, Bangkok governor Aswin Kwanmuang, and the National Environment Board were summoned to testify yesterday at the Central Administrative Court over the PM2.5 air pollution crisis that has affected Greater Bangkok for nearly two months.

The court was expected to question Mr Prayut, Mr Aswin and members of the board in response to a complaint filed by the Stop Global Warming Association (SGWA) and 41 Bangkok residents.

The complainants accuse them of negligence over the smog crisis, saying they failed to invoke the Environment Act and the Public Health Act to control PM2.5 levels.

The World Health Organisation describes PM2.5 as carcinogenic. The particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres or less is a cause of several other health problems, with long-term exposure linked to mortality.

According to the complaint, the officials' negligence in tackling the crisis forced many schools and businesses to temporarily close last month.

A number of people have also developed respiratory disorders and the Thai economy has suffered serious damage.

Tourists, moreover, are reluctant to come to Thailand over reported air quality problems, say the complainants.

The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration is using drones to spray a water-based solution in the air to try and ease the effects of heavy smog.
The Bangkok Metropolitan Administration is using drones to spray a water-based solution in the air to try and ease the effects of heavy smog. PHOTO: EPA-EFE

"We will prepare evidence of negligence and will strongly urge the court to order the three accused to swiftly introduce measures to deal with the sources of air pollution," said SGWA president Srisuwan Janya. He added that those burning sugarcane plantations and those buying burnt sugarcane should also face punishment.

The Thai Chamber of Commerce, meanwhile, has warned that if the smog crisis is prolonged, financial damages would amount to between 10 billion baht and 15 billion baht (S$434 million and S$651 million) a month. That estimate is based on the money people will have to spend on medical bills and N95 facial masks, as well as dwindling tourism income.

According to the Thai Chamber of Commerce, people are already spending about 594 baht a month on average for masks and related protective products.

With members of the public becoming more aware of the dangers posed by PM2.5, their spending would likely jump to 802 baht a month if the smog crisis drags on for as long as six months.

 

"We conducted an opinion survey on the crisis during the Chinese New Year festival which found that people are worried that the PM2.5 problem will be prolonged," said Mr Thanawat Polvichai, director of the Economic and Business Forecast Centre of the University of Thai Chamber of Commerce, on Wednesday.

THE NATION/ASIA NEWS NETWORK

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 08, 2019, with the headline 'Thai PM, Bangkok chief hauled to court over air pollution crisis'. Print Edition | Subscribe