Orphaned dugongs become conservation icons in Thailand

A dugong, named Jamil, had gas building up in his stomach and intestines after his digestive system failed. Despite a team of five veterinarians racing to keep the 27kg orphaned calf alive, he went into shock and died after an operation to remove sea
A dugong, named Jamil, had gas building up in his stomach and intestines after his digestive system failed. Despite a team of five veterinarians racing to keep the 27kg orphaned calf alive, he went into shock and died after an operation to remove seagrass clogging his stomach, at the Phuket Marine Biological Centre last Thursday.PHOTO: DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES
Above: Rescued dugong Mariam exposing her pink belly and relaxing in the arms of a carer. Left: Pieces of plastic that were found in the intestinal tract of Mariam. The dugong died on Aug 17 at the Trang province marine park. PHOTOS: DEPARTMENT OF MA
Above: Rescued dugong Mariam exposing her pink belly and relaxing in the arms of a carer. PHOTO: DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND COASTAL RESOURCES OF THAILAND/ FACEBOOK
A dugong, named Jamil, had gas building up in his stomach and intestines after his digestive system failed. Despite a team of five veterinarians racing to keep the 27kg orphaned calf alive, he went into shock and died after an operation to remove sea
Above: Pieces of plastic that were found in the intestinal tract of Mariam. The dugong died on Aug 17 at the Trang province marine park. PHOTO: , AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Deaths cast spotlight on ocean preservation, force nation to face disposable plastic habit

Little Jamil bobbed in a white-tiled tank next to tubs of rehabilitating turtles with severed flippers or other injuries.

The dugong's digestive system was failing, causing gas to build up in his stomach and intestines. His heart was beating too fast.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on August 25, 2019, with the headline 'Orphaned dugongs become conservation icons in Thailand'. Print Edition | Subscribe