Malaysia will send back Muslim preacher if India requests extradition

 Zakir Naik, 52, is accused of inciting youth to take up terror acts and join terror outfits such as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).
Zakir Naik, 52, is accused of inciting youth to take up terror acts and join terror outfits such as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS).PHOTO: BERNAMA

KUALA LUMPUR - Malaysia will send controversial televangelist Zakir Naik back to India if its government requests his extradition, said Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi on Wednesday (Nov 8).

The Muslim preacher is a permanent resident in Malaysia, and is believed to be in the country.

In late October he was charged by India's National Investigation Agency (NIA) for inciting terror and delivering hate speeches.

According to the Malay Mail Online, Datuk Seri Zahid, who is also Home Minister, told Parliament that India had not requested extradition yet, but Putrajaya will go ahead with deportation if requested via the Mutual Legal Assistance programme between the two governments.

He added that there is as yet no application from Zakir to become a Malaysian citizen, contrary to earlier reports in the Indian media.

His international passport has been revoked by the Indian government.

Zakir, 52, is accused of inciting youth to take up terror acts and join terror outfits such as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). He has reportedly recommended the death penalty for homosexuals and those who abandon Islam as their faith. A YouTube video shows him saying that if Osama bin Laden "is terrorising America the terrorist, the biggest terrorist, I am with him".

Bangladesh suspended Peace TV channel, which features his preachings, after some media reports claimed bombers of a Dhaka cafe that killed 22 people last year were fans of Zakir.

 

Zakir has denied the accusations against him and has claimed that he was being targeted by India's Hindu nationalist government because of his popularity.

The preacher has a substantial following in Malaysia, with both Dr Zahid and Prime Minister Najib Razak posting photos taken with him last year on Facebook.

Opposition Parti Islam SeMalaysia (PAS) had previously urged the government to disregard any potential Indian extradition request, saying the allegations aim "to block his influence and efforts to spread religious awareness among the international community".

Dr Ahmad Zahid had told Parliament on Oct 31 that Zakir had not broken any laws or regulations during his stay in Malaysia. "As such, there is no reason from a legal standpoint to detain or arrest him," he said.

He assured lawmakers today that the government would continue to monitor Zakir's activities in the country and would take action if he got involved in any terrorist activities, reported The Star.