KL launches ambitious plan to eliminate graft in 5 years

Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad joined Deputy Prime Minister Wan Azizah Wan Ismail and Chief Secretary Ismail Bakar to pose with a book outlining anti-corruption legislation during the launch of the National Anti-Corruption Plan in Putrajay
Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad joined Deputy Prime Minister Wan Azizah Wan Ismail and Chief Secretary Ismail Bakar to pose with a book outlining anti-corruption legislation during the launch of the National Anti-Corruption Plan in Putrajaya yesterday.PHOTO: EPA-EFE

Scrutiny on how key posts are decided, laws on political funding among new measures

Malaysia's Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, who is sometimes blamed for tolerating corruption and the rise of cronyism during his first stint as prime minister, yesterday launched an ambitious plan to make the country corruption-free in five years.

The eight-month-old government, which stormed to power amid voters' anger over the massive 1MDB or 1Malaysia Development Berhad graft scandal and other corruption cases, unveiled yesterday the wide-ranging National Anti-Corruption Plan (NACP).

Tun Dr Mahathir said at its launch that the Pakatan Harapan (PH) government will review how appointments to key government posts are made, introduce new laws on political funding, and will require politicians and high-ranking civil servants to declare their assets.

He said the plan is about curbing corruption and not about punishing past wrongdoings.

"Before May 9, 2018, many Malaysians were sick with instances of widespread corruption taking place in the country involving the government, which has been labelled internationally as a kleptocracy - a very shameful label," he said in a speech.

"This label was not created by me or my government. It was given by the foreign media when the foreign authorities discovered the involvement of past leaders in money laundering, graft and cheating."

This is not the first time the government has launched an ambitious move to curb corruption.

SICK OF CORRUPTION

Before May 9, 2018, many Malaysians were sick with instances of widespread corruption taking place in the country involving the government, which has been labelled internationally as a kleptocracy - a very shameful label. This label was not created by me or my government. It was given by the foreign media when the foreign authorities discovered the involvement of past leaders in money laundering, graft and cheating.

MALAYSIA PRIME MINISTER MAHATHIR MOHAMAD

The Abdullah Badawi administration in 2004 launched the five-year National Integrity Plan (NIP) and gave more powers to the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission, projects that were passed to the next government led by Najib Razak.

But Dr Mahathir said yesterday that the NIP had failed to reduce the "culture of corruption".

Dr Mahathir himself has sometimes been accused of tolerating corruption and the rise of cronyism in his 22 years as prime minister until 2003, with the rise of tycoons associated with his administration.

But this time around, he is leading a different government, with some of the PH leaders in his Cabinet known for their strong reformist credentials. Reflecting the wide support of the anti-graft fight, the two biggest opposition parties attended the NACP's launch in Putrajaya - Parti Islam SeMalaysia president Abdul Hadi Awang and Umno's acting president Mohamad Hasan.

The previous Najib administration was toppled in the May 9 general election after being embroiled in the scandal involving state fund 1MDB.

 
 
 

Najib is facing a slew of graft-related charges, as is former deputy prime minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi, former federal territories minister Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor, and former chief of the Federal Land Development Authority (Felda) agency Isa Samad.

Meanwhile, Transparency International Malaysia president Akhbar Satar said yesterday that Malaysia has edged up one position in the organisation's latest global index on corruption to 61st position among 180 countries.

Critics of PH, however, have expressed concern over reports of graft within the ruling coalition itself. A recent by-election in Cameron Highlands in Pahang state was marred by accusations of vote-buying. Dr Mahathir responded last week by saying that the reports over graft cases are on the rise because people feel freer to report such shady incidents.


Measures to tackle graft

The Pakatan Harapan alliance toppled long-ruling Barisan Nasional that was reeling from a spate of major scandals, including 1MDB.

These are among the measures being launched by the Malaysian government as it tries to eliminate graft:

• Review how appointments to key government posts are made.

• Introduce new laws on political funding for politicians and political parties.

• Politicians and high-ranking civil servants must declare their assets.

• Enhance credibility of legal and judicial system.

• Improve corporate governance.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 30, 2019, with the headline 'KL launches ambitious plan to eliminate graft in 5 years'. Print Edition | Subscribe