News analysis

Indonesia's new omnibus law can make or break Jokowi's legacy

University students and members of Indonesian trade unions protest against the government's labor reforms in Banyumas, Indonesia, on Oct 7, 2020. PHOTO: REUTERS
Demonstrators clash with police officers following a protest against the government's labor reforms in Banyumas, Indonesia, on Oct 7, 2020. PHOTO: REUTERS
Mr Joko Widodo's omnibus law was passed in Parliament on Oct 5, 2020. PHOTO: REUTERS
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When Mr Joko Widodo was re-elected as Indonesia's president last year, his dream was to transform the country into one that would have an annual per capita income of 320 million rupiah (US$29,000) and a gross domestic product of US$7 trillion by 2045.

Pledging additional economic reforms during his Oct 20 inauguration speech, he spoke of an Indonesia that would escape the middle-income trap and become one of the top five world economies with a poverty rate close to zero.

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