Do Singapore and Johor need a third link?

Commuters say a link could improve traffic but concerns, like cost, need to be considered

Commuters who support a new link say that it will help to reduce traffic jams and improve business, while those who are less supportive question the high costs and whether it will really solve the traffic issues.
At the Tuas checkpoint, queues can be especially long during festive seasons and the wait to get across could stretch for hours. View of the Pasir Gudang industrial area in Johor from Punggol Point. The suggestion of a new bridge leading to Malaysia
For people who have to commute to work, mostly Malaysians entering Singapore, the traffic jams on the Causeway can be a daily nightmare. ST PHOTO: DESMOND WEE
At the Tuas checkpoint, queues can be especially long during festive seasons and the wait to get across could stretch for hours. View of the Pasir Gudang industrial area in Johor from Punggol Point. The suggestion of a new bridge leading to Malaysia
At the Tuas checkpoint, queues can be especially long during festive seasons and the wait to get across could stretch for hours.ST PHOTO: KELVIN CHNG
At the Tuas checkpoint, queues can be especially long during festive seasons and the wait to get across could stretch for hours. View of the Pasir Gudang industrial area in Johor from Punggol Point. The suggestion of a new bridge leading to Malaysia
View of the Pasir Gudang industrial area in Johor from Punggol Point. The suggestion of a new bridge leading to Malaysia has sparked discussion. ST PHOTO: ARLINA ARSHAD

From the tranquil waterfront district of Punggol, the skyline of towering cranes and industrial buildings of Johor's Pasir Gudang looms across the water. Boats cruise along the deep Johor Strait and wild otters splash around near the jetty.

Here on the north-eastern tip of Singapore, a new bridge leading to Malaysia could one day become a reality, if the idea floated by Malaysian Land Minister Xavier Jayakumar earlier this month to ease traffic jams receives the thumbs-up from the governments of both countries. It will then be the third road crossing, in addition to the Causeway in Woodlands and the Second Link bridge in Tuas.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on October 28, 2018, with the headline 'Do Singapore and Johor need a third link?'. Print Edition | Subscribe