After the Thai royal storm, Princess Ubolratana's short foray into politics seems like a footnote

Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya officiating at the opening of a centre for the To Be Number One anti-drug and youth development project at Phichit Pittayakom school on Thursday.
Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya officiating at the opening of a centre for the To Be Number One anti-drug and youth development project at Phichit Pittayakom school on Thursday.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/TO BE NUMBER ONE FANCLUB
Princess Ubolratana (above) performing in front of students (below) at Phichit Pittayakom school on Thursday. More than 1,000 students turned up to see her in one of her first few public appearances since Feb 8, when the Thai Raksa Chart party, linke
Princess Ubolratana (above) performing in front of students at Phichit Pittayakom school on Thursday. More than 1,000 students turned up to see her in one of her first few public appearances since Feb 8, when the Thai Raksa Chart party, linked to former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, nominated her as its prime minister candidate for next month's polls.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/TO BE NUMBER ONE FANCLUB
Princess Ubolratana (above) performing in front of students (below) at Phichit Pittayakom school on Thursday. More than 1,000 students turned up to see her in one of her first few public appearances since Feb 8, when the Thai Raksa Chart party, linke
Princess Ubolratana performing in front of students (above) at Phichit Pittayakom school on Thursday. More than 1,000 students turned up to see her in one of her first few public appearances since Feb 8, when the Thai Raksa Chart party, linked to former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, nominated her as its prime minister candidate for next month's polls.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/TO BE NUMBER ONE FANCLUB

Thai Princess' short foray into politics seems like a footnote, with talk centring on whether King knew of her plans

Clad in leg-hugging pants and a jacket studded with glittering hearts, Thai Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya performs a cheeky luk thung number that leaves her audience gyrating downstage. The crowd, already stoked by the country music, squeals when she starts flinging stalks of roses into the air.

"It's Valentine's Day today. Let's love each other, okay?" she tells the teenagers massed at a school in Phichit province, some 300km north of Bangkok, for a concert held as part of her anti-drug campaign. "I'm happy to come see you all in person. Seeing (each other) from television may not be good enough."

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on February 17, 2019, with the headline 'After the royal storm'. Print Edition | Subscribe