STUBBING OUT A GLOBAL MENACE: Anti-smoking measures

Japan and South Korea: Tougher measures in 'smokers' paradise'

A "No Smoking On The Streets" sign in Tokyo's Chiyoda ward, the first of the Japanese capital's 23 wards to outlaw public smoking in 2002, with offenders facing fines of 2,000 yen (S$25).
A "No Smoking On The Streets" sign in Tokyo's Chiyoda ward, the first of the Japanese capital's 23 wards to outlaw public smoking in 2002, with offenders facing fines of 2,000 yen (S$25).ST PHOTO: WALTER SIM

A 20-stick pack of Marlboro Lights in Japan costs 510 yen (S$6.40). In South Korea, it costs 4,500 won (S$5.50). Puff-happy Japan and South Korea have already seen some success as they take steps to fight second-hand smoke, with measures such as a smoking ban at public facilities and limiting smoking to clearly marked zones.

South Korea last Monday enacted a law that bans people from lighting up within 10m of its 390,000 childcare centres and 9,000 kindergartens, with fines of up to 100,000 won (S$120).

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on January 06, 2019, with the headline 'Tougher measures in 'smokers' paradise''. Print Edition | Subscribe