Hong Kong protesters plan march to seek probe into assault at train station

A police officer removing a demonstrator who was preventing the doors of a train from closing at Admiralty station in Hong Kong yesterday. The disruption by a small group of protesters caused travel delays during the morning rush hour.
A police officer removing a demonstrator who was preventing the doors of a train from closing at Admiralty station in Hong Kong yesterday. The disruption by a small group of protesters caused travel delays during the morning rush hour. PHOTO: BLOOMBERG

HONG KONG • Protesters in Hong Kong are organising a march in the north-western suburb of Yuen Long on Saturday, in a bid to demand an independent probe into the brazen assault at the MTR station there on Sunday night, public broadcaster RTHK reported yesterday.

Mr Max Chung, a Yuen Long resident, said he has applied for police approval for the rally on behalf of the protesters.

Meanwhile, Hong Kong's rail operator said normal train service had resumed after a small group of anti-government protesters caused a disruption during the city's notoriously busy morning rush yesterday, stranding crowds of commuters on platforms at a main station, Bloomberg reported.

Trains on the Island Line, which cuts through the city's financial centre, had returned to their regular schedule, MTR Corp said in a statement yesterday.

Earlier, the operator had warned that travel times were extended by 10 to 15 minutes due to "a number of train door obstruction incidents".

Protesters who have been campaigning for weeks against Chief Executive Carrie Lam's bid to ease extraditions to mainland China had said they planned to interrupt the morning service, Bloomberg said.

The move came after dozens of protesters and other passengers were injured on Sunday when mobs of stick-wielding men attacked them at Yuen Long MTR station.

Some protesters yesterday wore surgical masks to hide their identities and were seen on platforms at Admiralty station shouting at police officers as commuters stood in long lines to board trains.

At least one demonstrator wore a hard hat with a note commemorating Sunday's violence on it.

Police removed at least three protesters who were obstructing train doors. Some passengers shouted insults at the demonstrators disrupting their commutes.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 25, 2019, with the headline Hong Kong protesters plan march to seek probe into assault at train station. Subscribe