Inter-Korean projects in pipeline

North Korean Kang Ho Rye (right), 89, hugging her South Korean sister Kang Du-ri, 87, as they bid farewell at the last meeting of a three-day family reunion event at North Korea's Mount Kumgang resort on Aug 26. Millions of Koreans were separated fro
North Korean Kang Ho Rye (right), 89, hugging her South Korean sister Kang Du-ri, 87, as they bid farewell at the last meeting of a three-day family reunion event at North Korea's Mount Kumgang resort on Aug 26. Millions of Koreans were separated from their relatives by the 1950-1953 conflict, which left the peninsula divided and all civilian communication banned between the two sides. Since 2000, the two Koreas have held 20 rounds of reunions, but time is running out for many ageing family members.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

SEOUL • A whopping 471.2 billion won, or S$575 million. That is how much South Korea wants to devote to inter-Korea projects over this and next year, from renovating old railways to revamping roads and replanting trees on bald mountains in the North.

As North Korea prepares to give up its nuclear weapons to focus on economic growth, opportunities abound for the South Korean government and businesses to help.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 18, 2018, with the headline 'Inter-Korean projects in pipeline'. Print Edition | Subscribe