Protests in Hong Kong

'I can't even see tomorrow,' says Hong Kong youth

Protesters holding placards and strips of cloth with protest messages at last Friday's rally. But discontent had already reared its head during the Occupy Movement in 2014. The protesters broke into the Parliament chambers of the Legislative Council
Protesters holding placards and strips of cloth with protest messages at last Friday's rally. But discontent had already reared its head during the Occupy Movement in 2014. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
Protesters holding placards and strips of cloth with protest messages at last Friday's rally. But discontent had already reared its head during the Occupy Movement in 2014. The protesters broke into the Parliament chambers of the Legislative Council
The protesters broke into the Parliament chambers of the Legislative Council building last Monday. They organised themselves into groups, some helping with logistics or serving as medics, while others provided reinforcements to those on the front line.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Never before has Hong Kong seen such turmoil. Out of a population of 7.5 million, one million people marched on a Sunday last month and another two million the following Sunday. They want the withdrawal of an extradition Bill that would enable the city to send suspects to China because they distrust the opaque judicial system there. Young protesters clashed with police on June 12 and stormed the Legislative Council last Monday. More protests are being planned. Insight looks at why this is happening and where things might lead to.

Events organiser Adrian Lam wants to marry his long-term girlfriend, buy a place to live and maybe have a child. But all these seem increasingly unlikely on his pay of HK$22,500 ($3,900) a month, slightly above average by Hong Kong standards.

"We don't qualify for public housing because our combined salary is above the threshold but if we want to buy an apartment, it's going to cost us far too much. Of course some people say if we spend less and save every dollar, we would be able to afford an apartment," the 29-year-old said, adding that renting is "putting money into a sinkhole".

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on July 07, 2019, with the headline ''I can't even see tomorrow''. Print Edition | Subscribe