How Singapore can gain from Silk Road project

Kazakhstan's Khorgos East Gate, a dry container port next to the border with China, where Chinese trains will unload containers for transhipment to Central Asia and Europe.
Kazakhstan's Khorgos East Gate, a dry container port next to the border with China, where Chinese trains will unload containers for transhipment to Central Asia and Europe.PHOTO: KHORGOS GATEWAY

It has been touted as one of the most ambitious plans of the 21st century so far. China's Belt and Road Initiative has not only gained attention because it spans Asia, Africa and Europe and covers 60 per cent of the world's population, but also because the participating countries cover around a third of the world's gross domestic product and world trade. They also contain 60 per cent of the world's population. Claire Huang looks at how it could help Singapore businesses and whether it will live up to its hype.

What is the BRI?

Unveiled in late 2013, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) - formerly known as One Belt, One Road - is Chinese President Xi Jinping's signature foreign and economic policy initiative.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 03, 2018, with the headline 'How S'pore can gain from Silk Road project'. Print Edition | Subscribe