Hong Kong rights group urges silent march ahead of G-20 meet

About 300 people gathering last night outside the Hong Kong Legislative Council Complex in Admiralty, where a succession of speakers spoke about police brutality and what to do in case of an arrest. They levelled accusations of police brutality after
About 300 people gathering last night outside the Hong Kong Legislative Council Complex in Admiralty, where a succession of speakers spoke about police brutality and what to do in case of an arrest. They levelled accusations of police brutality after officers on June 12 fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse protesters who had surrounded the legislature.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

Protest organisers aim to draw world leaders' attention to controversial extradition Bill

Protest organisers yesterday called on Hong Kongers to take part in a "silent march" on Wednesday to call attention to a divisive extradition Bill during the G-20 summit, which begins on Friday.

The Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), which was behind two massive rallies earlier this month, said the march will start in the heart of the business district and pass the consulates of each of the G-20 member nations.

"On July 1, we should gather even more people to tell Carrie Lam and the government that we have the same five demands that they have not responded to," said CHRF vice-convenor Figo Chan, referring to Hong Kong's Chief Executive Lam.

Some two million black-clad Hong Kongers - police put the figure at 340,000 - rallied on June 16 against the Bill, which, if passed, would have allowed the handover of fugitives to several jurisdictions, including mainland China.

Meanwhile, some 300 people attended a gathering last night outside the Legislative Council building, where a succession of speakers spoke about police brutality and what to do in case of an arrest.

This was in response to accusations of police brutality after law enforcement officers on June 12 fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse protesters who had surrounded the legislature.

Police said they were reacting to some in the crowd who had thrown bricks and metal poles at them.

 

Thousands of mostly young, black-clad protesters last Friday had also surrounded the police headquarters in Wan Chai for some 16 hours to demonstrate their unhappiness with police behaviour.

They blocked a key road before the central government offices and entrances to the police complex. Chanting "Police, disgrace", they demanded that Police Commissioner Stephen Lo meet them, as they vandalised the building and covered closed-circuit cameras with tape.

Seemingly leaderless, protesters have called for the escalation after the government failed to meet their demands by a Thursday deadline.

They are calling for the now-suspended extradition Bill to be completely withdrawn, police behaviour on June 12 be looked into by an independent commission, the labelling of the protest as a "riot" be retracted, and the unconditional release of those arrested during the protest.

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 24, 2019, with the headline 'HK rights group urges silent march ahead of G-20 meet'. Print Edition | Subscribe