Elderly crime on the rise in greying Japan

Prison guards escorting inmates along a marked pathway at Sasebo Prison in Nagasaki prefecture. The Justice Ministry's annual White Paper on crime noted that 19 per cent of elderly men and 34 per cent of elderly women reoffended within two years of b
Prison guards escorting inmates along a marked pathway at Sasebo Prison in Nagasaki prefecture. The Justice Ministry's annual White Paper on crime noted that 19 per cent of elderly men and 34 per cent of elderly women reoffended within two years of being fined for non-violent theft.PHOTO: BLOOMBERG

Seniors behind record 21.5% of all penal code offences last year, even as overall crime drops

With one hand gripping a walking cane and the other tucked into the pocket of his black jacket, retiree Yoshikane Omi hobbled along a deserted shopping street in the middle of a cold November night.

The 71-year-old former salaryman, who had a stroke a few years ago, lives in a two-storey home in Yokohama with his wife, who works part-time at a convenience store to make ends meet. Their three adult children have moved out.

Please or to continue reading the full article. Learn more about ST PREMIUM.

Enjoy unlimited access to ST's best work

  • Exclusive stories and features on multiple devices
  • In-depth analyses and opinion pieces
  • ePaper and award-winning multimedia content
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 28, 2018, with the headline 'Elderly crime on the rise in greying Japan'. Print Edition | Subscribe