South Korea

Falling birth rates in South Korea: Career comes first for many and prejudices don't help

Premium centres such as Repirium Postpartum Care Centre in Seoul, which offer hotel-style rooms, pampering spa services and babycare by former nurses, have grown in popularity as more mothers are willing to splurge on post-childbirth care since they
Premium centres such as Repirium Postpartum Care Centre in Seoul, which offer hotel-style rooms, pampering spa services and babycare by former nurses, have grown in popularity as more mothers are willing to splurge on post-childbirth care since they tend to stop at one child. ST PHOTO: CHANG MAY CHOON
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Ms Lee Sung-hee imagines herself getting married in her mid-30s and becoming a Dink - an acronym for "double income, no kids".

"I will never have a kid. I don't want to sacrifice for the child. I think my own life is more important," said the 24-year-old job seeker. "I also told my boyfriend that I will not have a baby, so he should get pregnant himself if he wants one."

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on June 09, 2019, with the headline Falling birth rates in South Korea: Career comes first for many and prejudices don't help. Subscribe