Recent Aussie polls reflect resistance to global populist tide

Left: In recent polls in South Australia, Mr Nick Xenophon's SA Best party failed to secure a seat in the Lower House and won only 14 per cent of the primary vote. Analysts say the failure of his party was due to lack of readiness or policy detail. B
In recent polls in South Australia, Mr Nick Xenophon's SA Best party failed to secure a seat in the Lower House and won only 14 per cent of the primary vote. Analysts say the failure of his party was due to lack of readiness or policy detail.
Left: In recent polls in South Australia, Mr Nick Xenophon's SA Best party failed to secure a seat in the Lower House and won only 14 per cent of the primary vote. Analysts say the failure of his party was due to lack of readiness or policy detail. B
Ms Pauline Hanson's One Nation party has faced similar problems, even though it has a very different political agenda.

Observers say minor parties are unlikely to dislodge the major ones any time soon

Populist parties and leaders have been gaining ground across the world in recent years, but Australia is emerging as something of an anomaly.

At a series of recent elections - including a state poll and a federal by-election earlier this month - smaller parties recorded disappointing results and Australian voters appeared to be shifting towards the reliable centre.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Thank you for reading The Straits Times

You have reached one of our Premium stories. To continue reading, get access now or log in if you are a subscriber.

What is Premium?

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 26, 2018, with the headline 'Recent Aussie polls reflect resistance to global populist tide'. Print Edition | Subscribe