Brawl breaks out over oBike's shared bikes on Melbourne train

The video showed a bald man who appeared to be angry with a group of youngsters that had brought the bikes into the train carriage.
The video showed a bald man who appeared to be angry with a group of youngsters that had brought the bikes into the train carriage.PHOTOS: INSTAGRAM/LUKEBENNIE_

A brawl over the presence of shared bicycles belonging to oBike on a train in Melbourne erupted on Saturday (Nov 18).

Footage of the incident was captured by Instagram user Luke Bennie.

The altercation is believed to have occurred at Melbourne Central station on the Hurstbridge Line at about 6pm, reported The Sydney Morning Herald.

The video showed a bald man who appeared to be angry with a group of youngsters that had brought the bikes into the train carriage.

He was filmed expressing his concern that the bikes would be sent "flying" if the train braked suddenly.

One of the youngsters replied: "It's not against the law to have bikes on the train."

According to Public Transport Victoria's website, bikes are indeed allowed on metropolitan trains, but cyclists are instructed to keep clear of doorways and to avoid travelling during peak hours.

The youngster's response only served to anger the bald man even more, and he continued his expletives-laced tirade, asking them to get the bikes off at the next stop.

Following an exchange of words, one of the youngsters pushed his bike away and approached the bald man, who swung a few punches before other passengers broke up the fight.

 

A Victoria Police spokesman said on Monday morning that the police were not aware of the incident being reported, although a Metro spokesman said the company is investigating the incident.

"While incidents like this are rare, the behaviour depicted in this video is disgraceful and unacceptable," she said.

Bike-sharing schemes in Australia have hit a road bump of late, with betting agencies in Melbourne even taking bets on how many bikes will be dumped into the Yarra River.

Abuse of the bikes - which end up in strange places such as trees, waterways and even on top of portable toilets- have prompted anger from the authorities, who have vowed to introduce regulations.