Aussie police charge three men over 'mass' attack plot

Police outside a house in a Melbourne suburb that was raided following the arrest yesterday of three men said to have been plotting "chilling" terror attacks in the Australian city.
Police outside a house in a Melbourne suburb that was raided following the arrest yesterday of three men said to have been plotting "chilling" terror attacks in the Australian city.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Yesterday's arrests come less than two weeks after man killed while carrying out terror act

SYDNEY • Police yesterday said they had arrested three men who were allegedly preparing to attack a "mass gathering" in Melbourne, less than two weeks after a man was killed in Australia's second-largest city during what police described as an act of terrorism.

The Australian Security Intelligence Organisation, federal and state police as well as other agencies that form part of the Joint Counter Terrorism Team carried out the arrests yesterday morning.

Police said three men - Hanifi Halis, 21, Samed Erikioglu, 26 and Ertunc Erikioglu, 30 - were taken into custody after they allegedly sought to acquire a semi-automatic gun to carry out an attack.

All three men have been charged with planning a terrorist act, police said. They are all Australian citizens and their passports were cancelled earlier this year.

"We have sufficient evidence to act in relation to preventing a terrorist attack," Mr Graham Ashton, Chief Commissioner of Victoria Police, told reporters.

Police said the suspects had yet to decide on the site of their planned attack but they believed it was imminent.

"They were certainly looking at a place of mass gathering, where there would be crowds," Mr Ashton said. "They were trying to focus on trying to have a place where they could kill as many people as possible." Police said they believed the arrests had nullified any threat from the group.

Police said they are combing through 17,000 intercepted phone calls and 10,500 messages exchanged between the men as part of evidence collected during their arrests. Police said it will take several months to transcribe the calls and messages.

Australia, a staunch US ally that sent troops to Afghanistan and Iraq, has been on heightened alert since 2014 for attacks by home-grown militants returning from fighting in the Middle East or their supporters.

 
 

Australia sees the likelihood of a militant attack as "probable", the midpoint on a five-level threat ranking system. It has been set at that level since the system was introduced in 2015.

Police said the three men were known to the authorities and their passports were cancelled because of concerns that they would travel to a conflict zone overseas.

The arrests came less than two weeks after a man set fire to a pickup truck laden with gas cylinders in the centre of Melbourne and stabbed three people, killing one, before he was shot by police.

As was the case in that attack, police yesterday said the three men just arrested had been inspired by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria group rather than being directed by the militant group.

The suspects had been using encrypted messaging apps to communicate, which an Australian government minister said was further evidence of the need to amend the law.

Australia proposed a law earlier this year that would require companies such as Facebook and Apple to provide access to private encrypted data linked to suspected illegal activities.

REUTERS

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 21, 2018, with the headline 'Aussie police charge three men over 'mass' attack plot'. Print Edition | Subscribe