World Briefs: Australia: Hacking by foreign spies

Australia: Hacking by foreign spies

SYDNEY • A malware attack on Australia's Bureau of Meteorology which might have spread to other government networks originated from a foreign intelligence service, an official report by the country's cyber defence agency said yesterday.

The Australian Cyber Security Centre's first public report did not say which foreign power authorised the attack last December, but it will add credibility to warnings from independent cyber security experts who have blamed countries like China and Russia for online attacks.

REUTERS


Lawyers for Paris attacks suspect quit

PARIS • Lawyers defending the man believed to be the sole living suspect in militant attacks that killed 130 people in France last November have resigned from the case after months in which their client refused to talk.

Salah Abdeslam, who has been held in solitary confinement near Paris since he was captured earlier this year, does not want to talk and no longer wants legal representation, his lawyers Frank Berton and Sven Mary said on BFM Television yesterday.

REUTERS


US men's toilets to get baby facilities

WASHINGTON • Male toilets in public buildings in the United States must now have baby-changing facilities, the BBC reported on Tuesday, citing a new law signed by US President Barack Obama.

Both male and female bathrooms should have a "physically safe, sanitary and appropriate" place to change a nappy, according to the Bathrooms Accessible in Every Situation Act.


Beaches closed after shark attack

SYDNEY • All beaches in Australia's Ballina New South Wales north coast have been closed after a man was bitten by a shark while surfing yesterday. It was the sixth such attack in 21 months in the area. The 25-year-old was wounded in his right leg.

XINHUA


Politician's picture on exam papers

NAIROBI • The authorities yesterday cancelled mock primary school exams in part of western Kenya after a local politician had his face printed on the publicly funded examination papers.

Mr Cornel Rasanga's likeness was printed in a bid to win the early support of future voters.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 13, 2016, with the headline 'World Briefs'. Print Edition | Subscribe