World Briefs: 10 injured at US neo-Nazi rally

10 injured at US neo-Nazi rally

SAN FRANCISCO • Ten people were wounded after a stabbing spree broke out during a neo-Nazi rally at California's state Capitol building, officials said.

The white supremacist rally on Sunday was met by counter-protesters, Sacramento Fire Department spokesman Chris Harvey said.

It was unclear to which group the wounded, who ranged in age from 19 to 58, belonged. Of those injured, at least two were in critical condition, Mr Harvey said.

AGENCE FRANCE PRESSE


Israel and Turkey mend relations

JERUSALEM • Israeli and Turkish leaders yesterday lauded a deal reached at the weekend to restore ties after six years of acrimony over a deadly raid on a Gaza-bound aid flotilla.

After the deal is signed today, the approval process will start in both countries, and the Turkish Premier said Ankara would appoint an ambassador to Tel Aviv within weeks.

AGENCE FRANCE PRESSE


S. Africa wants funds back from President

JOHANNESBURG • South African President Jacob Zuma should pay back US$500,000 (S$681,000) of public funds used to upgrade his private residence, in a scandal that has rocked his government, the National Treasury said yesterday.

"The reasonable percentage... that the President would have to pay personally would be 87.94 per cent," it said.

AGENCE FRANCE PRESSE


US picks first woman Nato deputy chief

BRUSSELS • Nato yesterday appointed Ms Rose Gottemoeller as deputy head of the US-led alliance, the first woman to hold the post, a statement said.

Ms Gottemoeller is a career US diplomat whose nomination to the Nato post in March by President Barack Obama ran into stiff Republican criticism that she was too soft on Russia.

AGENCE FRANCE PRESSE


Abortion rights victory at US court

WASHINGTON • The US Supreme Court yesterday handed a victory to abortion rights advocates, striking down a Texas law imposing strict regulations on abortion doctors and facilities that its critics contended were specifically designed to shut down clinics.

The 5-3 ruling held that the Republican-backed 2013 law placed an undue burden on women exercising their constitutional right to end a pregnancy established in the landmark 1973 Roe v Wade decision.

REUTERS

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 28, 2016, with the headline 'World Briefs'. Print Edition | Subscribe