While You Were Sleeping: 5 stories you might have missed, March 24 edition

The man identified in British media reports as Khalid Masood, being treated after the attack by the emergency services.
The man identified in British media reports as Khalid Masood, being treated after the attack by the emergency services.PHOTO: PA IMAGES VIA GETTY IMAGES

London attacks: Police identify Westminster attacker as British-born Khalid Masood, 52

The attacker who killed three people near parliament in London before being shot dead was named as a 52-year-old British-born man, Khalid Masood, who was once investigated by MI5 intelligence officers over concerns about violent extremism.

Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement issued by its Amaq news agency, but did not name Masood and gave no details.

It was not clear whether the attacker was directly connected to the militant group.

A fourth victim, a 75-year-old man, was declared dead on Thursday (March 23) after his life support in hospital was withdrawn.

READ MORE HERE

Donald Trump dealt blow on health-care plan as House puts off vote

US President Donald Trump failed to convince enough sceptical members of his own Republican Party to begin dismantling Obamacare, forcing the House of Representatives to delay a vote on the healthcare legislation.

The day was designed to be a big symbolic win for conservatives, with Trump and House Republican leaders planning the vote on the seventh anniversary of former Democratic President Barack Obama signing his namesake health-care law, formally known as the Affordable Care Act, which became a favoured target of Republicans.

Instead, the vote was postponed indefinitely, dealing a setback to Trump in what he hoped would be his first legislative victory. His staff and allies had billed him as "the closer" for high-stakes negotiations with lawmakers.

READ MORE HERE

Two thirds of cancers caused by random genetic mistakes - US study

About two thirds of cancers are caused by random typos in DNA that occur as normal cells make copies of themselves, a finding that helps explain why healthy individuals who do everything they can to avoid cancer are still stricken with the disease, US researchers said.

"These cancers will occur no matter how perfect the environment," said Dr Bert Vogelstein, a cancer geneticist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore whose study was published in the journal Science.

The new findings are based on genetic sequencing and cancer studies from 69 countries around the world. They follow a controversial 2015 study published in Science by the same researchers at Johns Hopkins that looked just at cancers in the United States.

READ MORE HERE

WikiLeaks documents: CIA able to permanently infect Apple Mac computers, plant bugs in new iPhones

The US Central Intelligence Agency is able to permanently infect an Apple Mac computer so that even reinstalling the operating system will not erase the bug, according to documents published by WikiLeaks.

In its second release allegedly from the CIA's arsenal of hacking tools, WikiLeaks also said that it appears the US spy agency has been able since 2008 to insert its bugs onto new and unused iPhones by intervening in Apple's supply and distribution network.

The release follows the initial publication on March 9 by the anti-secrecy group of thousands of pages of instructions and code from what it called the entire CIA arsenal of hacking tools.

READ MORE HERE 

Oscar winner Brie Larson to play America's first female presidential candidate

Academy Award-winning actress Brie Larson will star in a movie about the first woman to run for US president decades before American women even had the right to vote.

Larson, 27, will play the lead in Victoria Woodhull, a film by Amazon Studios about the 1872 presidential candidate of the same name, according to online entertainment magazine Deadline.com.

Woodhull was the first woman to seek the US presidency. Last year, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a Democrat, was the first woman to win the presidential nomination by a major political party.

READ MORE HERE