What's News: June 13, 2016

People hug outside the Stonewall Inn near a vigil for the victims in New York on June 12 following the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida.
People hug outside the Stonewall Inn near a vigil for the victims in New York on June 12 following the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. PHOTO: AFP

TOP OF THE NEWS

About 50 killed at US club

A US man of Afghan descent armed with guns and an unidentified "device" killed at least 50 people and injured dozens at a gay nightclub in Florida early yesterday before police shot him dead in what the US authorities described as a "terrorism incident". The mayor of Orlando has declared a state of emergency.


TOP OF THE NEWS

Upbeat aviation forecast

A study by the International Air Transport Association has predicted that the number of air travellers and aviation-related jobs in Singapore could more than double in 20 years. By 2035, the sector's contribution to Singapore's gross domestic product could increase to an estimated US$65 billion (S$88 billion), it forecast.


Paramilitary police officers on guard at Shanghai's Pudong airport after the blast.
Paramilitary police officers on guard at Shanghai's Pudong airport after the blast. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

WORLD

Blast in Shanghai airport

A man hurled homemade explosives at the main international airport in China's commercial hub of Shanghai yesterday, injuring four people, before he attempted suicide. He threw a beer bottle or bottles with explosive materials near a check-in counter, the authorities said.


WORLD

Yingluck 'meets her fans'

Ms Yingluck Shinawatra took a whirlwind tour of Thailand's Phrae province last weekend, as part of what she calls a drive to promote tourism and meet her fans. One observer calls such trips a "clever strategy" by the ousted premier, who is banned from politics.


OPINION

Going backwards for security

Singapore's move to delink civil service computers from the Internet has drawn flak, but is in fact a trend-setting move, as other governments mull going back to typewriters and analogue systems to protect sensitive information, writes Jonathan Eyal.


HOME

MOE on Singlish usage

While students should not use Singlish in formal communication in general, those who use Singlish words in an appropriate way in compositions will not be penalised, says the Education Ministry, after the addition of some Singlish words to the Oxford English Dictionary.


HOME

Poetic obituary goes viral

Businessman Ong Tiong Yeow, 52, wrote an unusual obituary in the form of a poem for his father Ong Peck Lye, who died of pneumonia last week aged 82. The poem, which mentioned his father's strengths and flaws, drew some 4,300 "likes" and 1,200 "shares" on Facebook.


BUSINESS

Consumer firms have it rough

Companies serving the consumer market have endured a bumpy year, as economic headwinds put pressure on local demand while cost issues persisted. Experts warn that their outlook will stay choppy over the next 12 months, although firms with a strong presence in foreign growth markets could offset domestic constraints.


SPORT

S. Korean bowlers triumph

For the first time since 2012, South Korean bowlers swept the top honours at the Singapore International Open, which concluded yesterday. Jung Da Wun regained her title in the women's final. In the men's event, Park Jong Woo beat 17-year-old Singaporean Timothy Tham 201-155 to claim his first Singapore title.


National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore at the elephant enclosure of the Singapore Zoo last Friday.
National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore at the elephant enclosure of the Singapore Zoo last Friday. ST PHOTO: LIM SIN THAI

LIFE

Zooming in on captive species

From a Brazilian porcupine photographed at the Saint Louis Zoo in Missouri to a proboscis monkey in the Singapore Zoo, about 6,000 creatures in zoos and aquariums have played model for National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore. The conservationist is halfway through his quest to photograph all of the 12,000 species in captivity.


LIFE

Not merely stereotypes


PHOTO: FOX

Fresh Off The Boat was the first US sitcom in two decades to feature an Asian cast (photo) when it debuted last year. Its breakout star Constance Wu and co-star Randall Park hope that, when the three child actors playing their sons grow up, Asian-American roles will no longer be rare.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 13, 2016, with the headline 'What's News'. Print Edition | Subscribe