US mother warns about choking hazard after daughter swallows fidget spinner part

Britton Joniac attempted to clean her fidget spinner by putting the toy in her mouth. She accidentally swallowed it and had trouble breathing.
Britton Joniac attempted to clean her fidget spinner by putting the toy in her mouth. She accidentally swallowed it and had trouble breathing.PHOTOS: FACEBOOK/KELLY ROSE JONIEC

HOUSTON - A 10-year-old girl in Texas had a frightening experience after choking on a part from a fidget spinner.

Britton Joniac's mother shared their ordeal on Facebook on Tuesday (May 16) as a warning to other parents, and the post has been shared more than 600,000 times.

The toy of the moment, a fidget spinner has three paddles which create a mesmerising pattern when spun.

The toy is said to help children, and even adults, focus or relieve stress. First created to help children who are autistic or have attention deficit disorder, they have become so popular that schools in the United States and Britain banned them for being a distraction during lessons.

But Ms Kelly Rose Joniec warned of another potential hazard. Her daughter had to go to the emergency room after swallowing one of the bearings on the spinner.

She wrote in her Facebook post that she was driving Britton home on Saturday when she heard "an odd retching noise in the back seat".

 
 

Britton had put part of her fidget spinner into her mouth to clean it and somehow swallowed it.

Ms Joniac tried the Heimlich manouevre, which involves hugging a choke victim from behind and thrusting her abdomen, but it did not work.

At the Texas Children's Hospital, medical staff located the bearing in Britton's oesophagus after an X-ray.

"Britton was taken to surgery to endoscopically locate and remove the object," Ms Joniac wrote.

"Fortunately we had a positive outcome, but it was pretty scary there for a while."

She warned parents that the fidget spinners have bushings, or bearings, that "pop out easily".

Spokeswoman Patty Davis from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission told CNN: "Anything with small parts, keep it away from young children. If it can fit through a toilet paper roll, don't give it to a young child, and make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions."